Content Marketing and Hip Hop: 3 Unexpected Similarities

microphoneSing it with me, “I said a hip, hop, the hippie, the hippie to the hip hip hop and you don’t stop the rockin’ to the bang bang boogie said up jumps the boogie to the rhythm of the boogie the beat!”

Man, I miss those old beats. Maybe it’s a sign of my age, but the music today just isn’t as cool.

The old school masters of hip hop knew more about making great content than we give them credit for. Artists like the Sugarhill Gang, Run DMC, Grandmaster Flash, and Queen Latifah had us all singing along without even noticing.

I know what you’re thinking – how is content marketing like hip hop? Just as great hip hop goes viral, great content is absorbed, liked, and shared with others without a second thought. Let’s take a look at some similarities between content marketing and hip hop.

That’s a Nice Flow

One of the great features of hip hop is its flow. The combination of rhythmic beats and great lyrics combine to create a compelling piece of content that everyone wants to hear. In the same vein, your content needs to have a flow that leads your readers along a journey. An easy way to check if your content is flowing well is to read it aloud. Often, a quick review before publishing will unveil any awkward language or sentence structures that may otherwise lead readers astray.

Remix and Reuse

Modern hip hop artists have become famous from remixing time-tested beats and adding their own spin. While there are some embarrassing accounts of “sampling” (see Vanilla Ice’s rip-off of Queen’s “Under Pressure” for tips on what not do to), remixing and reusing great beats has become a common way to get songs to quickly hit the top of the charts. When creating content, it’s okay to take an idea someone has already had and put your own spin on it. In fact, it’s part of what makes a good writer great. Just remember, if planning to “remix” your content, make sure to cite the original source.

U.N.I.T.Y.

The late 1980s and early 1990s brought refreshing female voices to the hip hop world. One of my favorite female hip hop artists, Queen Latifah, became famous for songs like “U.N.I.T.Y.,” which commanded the hip hop community to restore its respect for women. For generations, hip hop has been able to unite its community around certain goals and ideas. Great content should have the same effect on readers. Businesses can use content to unite readers towards a common goal. After reading your content, should the audience feel closer to your brand, use your solution to solve a problem, or simply share information with others? Make sure to follow up with a call to action.

Did I muck up the lyrics to Rapper’s Delight? Leave your corrections in a comment!

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Victoria

Victoria Schleicher is a graduate of the University of South Florida and holds a BA in Psychology. Although Victoria was successful in the mental health field, she chose to instead pursue her passion for writing and art, and is happy to be a part of the Content Equals Money team. When not writing, Victoria likes to create art, play with her cat, read, and go running.

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